Skip to main content

Example: Condo soundproofing


This short video from builder Matt Risinger covers a lot of the issues we've discussed in this soundproofing blog. Matt has a show on YouTube that gives examples of successful construction projects. In this example, he shows a soundproofing project in a two-unit condo with a shared wall between them.

They did everything right. The used staggered wall studs (with an 8-inch separation between the two units), Roxul batting, QuietRock on the walls, putty pads on the outlets, and Green Glue.

As a test, Matt turns on a boom box in one of the rooms and measures the decibel output. Then he goes to the room on the other side of the wall to show how much of that noise leaks through and uses a decibel meter again. It's almost silent. This is what you hope to achieve, especially with new construction. But it won't happen unless you use the type of materials and processes shown here.

Here's the video. Great job!

Comments

  1. It's great to be here and thanks for sharing information on soundproofing. As if you are located in Sydney, you don't need to get worried on Sound Proofing approach. NSW SCS is at your service with a single quote. Enjoy the Sound Proofing Service in Sydney at a reliable cost.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Combining QuietRock and Green Glue together

Two great products work great together. As I've mentioned before, I'm experimenting around with ways to reduce some of the noise problems in my apartment on a tight budget. I think I've found the best combination to date: adding a layer of QuietRock 510 over an existing layer of gypsum drywall with a layer of Green Glue inbetween.

This was sort of the best of both worlds: taking a pre-made, sound-dampened drywall and then adding it over a powerful, viscous layer of glue....onto drywall that was already on the wall studs. No demo needed. In this project, I basically added two sound-dampening layers to the original 1950s drywall (one layer in the QuietRock and the other layer created by the Green Glue) to address "flanking noise": feet, furniture, and shoes pounding on the bare floor of my downstairs neighbors' apartment. The amount of banging, bashing, and foot-stomping sounds coming from their very "wooden" apartment has been severe, and I've …

Blow-in cellulose and your hollow walls

It's not too late to insulate.  A few years ago, most American homes had no insulation in them. When a homeowner did insulate, it was usually with fiberglass batts.

Then along came some better products. One of them is blow-in cellulose insulation. Does it work? I can attest to this: YES. I've used it in walls and ceilings, and it works quite well for airborne noise. If you live in an uninsulated home and you hear your neighbors voices coming through your walls or ceilings, cellulose will dampen that noise or mute it entirely.

It doesn't work for all types of noise. But it doesn't eradicate impact noise. You might still hear the sounds of someone walking across a bare hardwood floor with their shoes on, for example, or hear wall-mounted cabinets opening and closing. There are other solutions for that, and by combining different solutions you can control most structural noise and create more privacy.

Low cost Blow-in insulation is inexpensive. You can hire a specialist …

D.I.Y. sound panels and studio hacks

Inexpensive D.I.Y. sound panels for home studios Looking for acoustic ideas for your home studio? YouTube has plenty of D.I.Y. videos for controlling sound and adding absorption.

If you're running a business (especially a restaurant), you need to buy professional, fire-rated sound control panels that conform to local codes. You might also need to speak with an acoustics expert. But for home projects, you might need only a quick hack for a small room.

These four videos show a range of materials. Notice that I didn't include any that use fiberglass batts because you don't want those tiny glass fibers coming through the fabric.

This video from DIY Perks shows how you can repurpose some old towels into a sound-absorbing panel.:



And this guy from JT Guitar leaves no stone unturned as he details everything you need to build sturdy wood-framed panels with insulation in them, including the shopping trip, the tools you need, the measurements (special bonus: metric), exactly where …